Movement News Coverage

Here’s a great article by Marguerite Ogle at pilates.about.com.

http://pilates.about.com/od/Pilates-Interviews/a/Inside-The-Pilates-Movie-A-Movement-Of-Movement.htm

 

 

 

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2012 Reel

It’s been a great year.  We’ve been driving, flying, biking, walking, and just moving in general  Burning Torch Productions has been logging miles and footage all year.  Here’s a glimpse into the world of Mark Pedri.

Tired, sleep deprived, and inspired at Sundance Film Festival

These three words can sum up this weekend.  Tired, sleep deprived, and inspired.  Despite the predicted record snowstorm, Carrie and I still decided to make the drive to Park City, UT for the 2012 Sundance Film Festival.  Everything that was predicted, was delivered, and then some.  The snow came in huge wet flakes that covered the bustling town of Park City.  Along with the excitement of extra 50,000 people in town for the festival, the snow made sure that our car got stuck at least 4 times.  The films also lived up to the ongoing hype of Sundance.  We had the opportunity to see the premieres for two films including Bones Brigade, which I have been looking forward to seeing ever since it was announced as in production.  This was skateboard and filmmaker legend, Stacy Peralta’s newest film.  I actually fell into the opportunity to ask Stacy a question about passion and filmmaking during a morning Q&A session.  That’s a whole other entry though.  The other film we saw was Declaration of War.  The weather was so bad that the director couldn’t even make it in for her own premiere.

Of all of the celebrities wandering about, I found my highlight of the weekend.  I had to opportunity to talk face to face with Glen Friedman.  If you don’t know who Glen is, a quick Google search should do the trick.  Basically, he is one of the most influential photographers of the last 30 years.  His roots are in the early skateboard and music scene of Southern California.  I’ve been looking at his photos in magazines since I was little and to get the opportunity to meet him was incredible.  Once again, that is a complete other entry for another day.  Rather than talking all day about the festival, I’ve decided to just show you some pictures.

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This Tuesday I’ll be headed to Cheyenne, WY to interview Governor Matt Mead for Energy! O Energy!  Check back for details on what he says about energy in Wyoming.

What’s in a story?

I have been hitting the editing pretty hard these last few weeks, maybe a little harder than I should.  Between the stack of hard drives to my left and the server to my right, I would say that if megabytes were Big Macs, I could feed the entire country for a year.  The amount of footage is irrelevant though.  The story that is emerging is what’s important.

On these long days that consistently drift into even longer nights of editing, I’ve found myself pondering the idea of a story.  What is it about a story that makes us so attracted to it?  There are so many exciting things happening every second of our lives, but every now and then, we choose to tune it all out and tune into a story.  Whether it’s a book, a film, or someone telling it to us, a story has the power to show an aspect of life that often goes unnoticed.  A story conveys truth.
At the root of every story is truth; the truth of human experience, the truth of emotion, the truth of life.  This is what brings us back, time and time again.  Life can be overwhelming, and as a result, one can become numb to the everyday experience.  Stories are where we run to replenish our soul of human experience.   This is what makes the “story” one of the greatest tools ever utilized by humans.  Even something as powerful as fire or electricity can’t reach the level that a story can.  Fire, electricity, and steel are all tools of a physical world.  A story is a tool of the mind.  As powerful as these energy producing machines that I have been studying are, they can’t do what a story does.

So as I sit here in front of the video footage of the last six months of my life, I am wondering what my story will be.   A director has a unique responsibility.  It’s the responsibility of creating a story for the world to experience, creating something for people to believe in.  It’s the responsibility of creating truth.

It’s not work

If you’ve ever wondered what the mind behind Burning Torch Productions thinks, this is for you.

With Energy! O Energy! in production and more projects on the burner, I’ve been working more hours per day than I care to keep track of.  When you’re self-employed, keeping track of your hours is depressing.  When it’s all said and done, the film is only about 90 minutes long, but the hours leading up to its completion will easily exceed 3000 hours.   Is it worth it?  Absolutely.  Do you think I’m crazy?  I don’t blame you.  Let’s look at the math.

1 feature length movie running time= 90-110 minutes.

Hours committed to making the movie estimate= 3000 hours.

3000 hours = 125 days = 1/3 of a year.

*This is for a film that’s only 2/3 complete.

Now you’re probably saying, “That’s impossible!”  But it’s not, and here’s why.

When I’m working on a film, I become completely consumed and passionate in the production.  Every thought in my head is somehow connected back to what I’m working on. In order to explore a topic, it must be looked at from every possible angle.  The number of ways to explore a topic is infinite.  Does this mean you shouldn’t try?  Of course not. It just means that you’ll never run out of studying.

So in other words, making a film is a full timejob, literally.  If I’m not spending my waking hours filming, editing, or producing, I’m thinking about the film in every part of my life and then dreaming about it at night (dreams weren’t included in the estimate above).Film is the creation of reality, which makes the human experience the ultimate guide to filmmaking.  Film is the magic of watching realty unfold in front of our eyes.  Even fictional films convey realty.  At the heart of a film is emotion and the emotion is real, even if the story that evokes it is made up.  Every second of every day is an opportunity to expand.  It can be as little as seeing something in the grocery store and writing it down on the back of my receipt.  It could be a conversation with a loved one.  The possibilitiesare infinite.  Nothing goes unnoticed.Actual deskwork may last from 8 to 6 or 7 or 8 or 9, but the deskwork is only a tiny part of the work that goes into making a film.  I don’t make 8am to 6pm films.  It’s not because I don’t want to, it’s because I can’t.  I can’t take on a film and just forget about it at quitting time.   I don’t leave work at work.  I can’t leave work at work because to me, it’s not work; it’s my life.Some people might call it being obsessive. Others might argue that it’s not a healthy lifestyle.   Call me insane.  Tell me it’s impossible and that it won’t last.  Say that it’s not worth it.  Try to change me.  It won’t work, because like I said before, it’s not work, it’s my life.

Mark

Thanks

It’s that time of the year. Everyone is traveling, spending time with family, and busy with the holidays. Burning Torch Productions would like to wish everyone a happy holiday season, and say thanks for all of your support. We have been traveling a bit ourselves, about 3000 miles so far. Carrie and I have traveled by train, bus, and car in our most recent adventure to the Pacific Northwest. Everything is finally starting to make sense. Having a large amount of the filming done, I have decided to dedicate a number of blogs to writing about the people who I have met on my travels. The list spans from energy industry workers to drifters on the street. There is an entire story alone about the people I have encountered. Make sure to check back to get a glimpse into the lives of some of the most interesting people I’ve ever met.

In the meantime, enjoy the holidays and stay warm! Here’s a picture that hopefully brings a chuckle to your day. Whoever said making movies couldn’t be fun?

Mark jumps on down to Phoenix with Carrie