Burning Torch Productions Announces its Latest Film

    First of all, thank you for joining The Movement!  I hope you are as excited as us about exploring one of the fastest growing activities in the world, Pilates.  My name is Mark Pedri and I’m a documentary filmmaker.  My passion is seeking out compelling stories and capturing them on film.  I would like to be the first to introduce to you A Movement of Movement.  

     Today is the official announcement of production and the light is green.  The film explores the human condition in the context of Pilates.  Many of you have probably heard of Pilates, or maybe you’ve even become passionate about it.  A Movement of Movement is your film.  Pilates has been spreading at a phenomenal rate in recent years, but what is really happening?  Sometimes in order to notice that you’re moving, you have to stop and look at what’s around you.  Ever since the dinner conversation that sparked the idea for this film, I have been trying to step back and see the movement.  We are living during a remarkable movement of ideas, activities, and philosophy.  You’re probably asking, what does this have to do with Pilates?  My answer is, everything.  We are living in A Movement of Movement.  

Throughout the production of A Movement of Movement, we will be posting updates about where we are, who we’re with, and what we’re doing. I want to share the adventure of Filmmaking.  Movementofmovement.com is a website built especially for you to stay up to date and be a part of the film.  I welcome, encourage, and value you comments, so don’t be shy!  The website is updated at least once every week with information about the film and also tidbits about the world we live in.  We also send out a newsletter that you can subscribe to here.

-Mark

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2012 Reel

It’s been a great year.  We’ve been driving, flying, biking, walking, and just moving in general  Burning Torch Productions has been logging miles and footage all year.  Here’s a glimpse into the world of Mark Pedri.

It’s not work

If you’ve ever wondered what the mind behind Burning Torch Productions thinks, this is for you.

With Energy! O Energy! in production and more projects on the burner, I’ve been working more hours per day than I care to keep track of.  When you’re self-employed, keeping track of your hours is depressing.  When it’s all said and done, the film is only about 90 minutes long, but the hours leading up to its completion will easily exceed 3000 hours.   Is it worth it?  Absolutely.  Do you think I’m crazy?  I don’t blame you.  Let’s look at the math.

1 feature length movie running time= 90-110 minutes.

Hours committed to making the movie estimate= 3000 hours.

3000 hours = 125 days = 1/3 of a year.

*This is for a film that’s only 2/3 complete.

Now you’re probably saying, “That’s impossible!”  But it’s not, and here’s why.

When I’m working on a film, I become completely consumed and passionate in the production.  Every thought in my head is somehow connected back to what I’m working on. In order to explore a topic, it must be looked at from every possible angle.  The number of ways to explore a topic is infinite.  Does this mean you shouldn’t try?  Of course not. It just means that you’ll never run out of studying.

So in other words, making a film is a full timejob, literally.  If I’m not spending my waking hours filming, editing, or producing, I’m thinking about the film in every part of my life and then dreaming about it at night (dreams weren’t included in the estimate above).Film is the creation of reality, which makes the human experience the ultimate guide to filmmaking.  Film is the magic of watching realty unfold in front of our eyes.  Even fictional films convey realty.  At the heart of a film is emotion and the emotion is real, even if the story that evokes it is made up.  Every second of every day is an opportunity to expand.  It can be as little as seeing something in the grocery store and writing it down on the back of my receipt.  It could be a conversation with a loved one.  The possibilitiesare infinite.  Nothing goes unnoticed.Actual deskwork may last from 8 to 6 or 7 or 8 or 9, but the deskwork is only a tiny part of the work that goes into making a film.  I don’t make 8am to 6pm films.  It’s not because I don’t want to, it’s because I can’t.  I can’t take on a film and just forget about it at quitting time.   I don’t leave work at work.  I can’t leave work at work because to me, it’s not work; it’s my life.Some people might call it being obsessive. Others might argue that it’s not a healthy lifestyle.   Call me insane.  Tell me it’s impossible and that it won’t last.  Say that it’s not worth it.  Try to change me.  It won’t work, because like I said before, it’s not work, it’s my life.

Mark

Thanks

It’s that time of the year. Everyone is traveling, spending time with family, and busy with the holidays. Burning Torch Productions would like to wish everyone a happy holiday season, and say thanks for all of your support. We have been traveling a bit ourselves, about 3000 miles so far. Carrie and I have traveled by train, bus, and car in our most recent adventure to the Pacific Northwest. Everything is finally starting to make sense. Having a large amount of the filming done, I have decided to dedicate a number of blogs to writing about the people who I have met on my travels. The list spans from energy industry workers to drifters on the street. There is an entire story alone about the people I have encountered. Make sure to check back to get a glimpse into the lives of some of the most interesting people I’ve ever met.

In the meantime, enjoy the holidays and stay warm! Here’s a picture that hopefully brings a chuckle to your day. Whoever said making movies couldn’t be fun?

Mark jumps on down to Phoenix with Carrie

Portland Pictures

We’ve made it to Portland and haven’t stopped shooting since we’ve arrived.  The nice thing about traveling to make a movie is that you enter each location with a fresh perspective.  Even the most beautiful landscapes can become boring if you see it everyday.  The change of scenery from Wyoming to Oregon has allowed me to capture the surroundings with a new eye.  The key to getting this perspective is to notice the small things and build with it.  Every moment is different in its own way.  The challenge of making films is making harmony out of those moments; all 29.9 per second.  One of the things that the Northwest far surpasses Wyoming with is water.  Check out our photo blog to see how I’m capturing this idea of water and how a society can be built around it, including energy production in the form of hydro power plants.

http://livingthedream.aminus3.com/

You Can be in the Film!

I have received some criticism for riding my bike on my previous journey through Wyoming this past August.  People have accused me of being slanted because I was riding a bike.  Apparently riding a bike is a “green” statement.  My only statement about riding a bike is that it’s the most enjoyable method of transportation that I have come across in my lifetime.  What other type of transportation can you see the world at a reasonable pace and jump of the occasional cliff when you’re bored?

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For the next leg of my journey I will be setting off in my 1990 Oldsmobile 98 Regency.  This certainly should clear my record.  What is the statement that I am trying to make by driving this car?  It’s my only method of transportation other than my bike and a month-long road trip in the winter, covering over 3200 miles is definitely a limiting factor when it comes to selecting transportation. As much as I would like to take my Olds on the entire trip, I’ll be borrowing a car midway to take to Seattle, riding with friends for another leg, taking the Greyhound bus for a section of the trip, riding the Amtrak train, and then finishing the trip by picking up my car where I’m leaving it halfway to get home.  I am estimating about a month on the road.  Here is a map of my tentative route.

 

 

 If any of you are located anywhere on my way, I would love to stop in and meet you.  I am always conducting public opinion interviews from people who use energy.  Do you use energy?  If you answered yes, this is your chance to be a part of something great!  I am also looking for people who work in the energy industry to comment on their perspective.  Comment or send me an email in a reasonable amount of time and I’ll do my best to give you a voice in the film.

Bonneville Power Administration

I’m back from Phoenix and packing for the next trip.  I have just found out that I’ll be headed to Portland, Oregon to talk with the senior vice president and executive vice president of Bonneville Power Administration.

The Columbia River is a large source of hydroelectricity generation for the Northwest

BPA is a public service organization that is in charge of getting power to the Pacific Northwest.  In other words, BPA makes sure that when you plug in your coffee maker or TV, it turns on and stays on.  That is huge!  Think about the logistics that goes into something that we have come to take for granted.  You have to decide how you’re going to make the energy.  You have to make the energy.  You have to make enough energy.  You can’t make too much energy.  You have to get the energy to the consumer.  You have to balance all of the different types of energy.  You have to make everyone happy, but at the same time, you have to provide them with enough energy to keep up with their demand.  Sometimes we want to save the planet without making any sacrifices.  Is this reasonable?  Whose job is it to make these decisions?  Imagine having to deal with all of these issues.  Doesn’t it sound like a huge job?  It sounds like one of the most complicated situations in our society today.  If this is such a huge job, then why haven’t we heard of organization like Bonneville Power Administration?  Is it a silent art and as long as they do their job well, they are invisible?  What exactly are they doing?  Why don’t more people know about what they do if it’s so important?  Have we taken the most elementary and necessary commodity other than food and water for granted?  Why?  That is my question.  Why do we as a society no longer think about this energy that seems to magically appear from the outlets in our house?  I will be continuing my journey to ask these questions in December by touring the Pacific Northwest and meeting with Bonneville Power Administration. Here is some background information about BPA.

http://www.bpa.gov/corporate/

http://www.bpa.gov/corporate/about_BPA/execs/embio.cfm

http://www.bpa.gov/corporate/about_BPA/execs/bsbio.cfm

On my way, I will be stopping at numerous energy production sites including hydroelectric sites, wind towers, a nuclear power station, and numerous natural gas power plants.  I will be home for about one and half weeks and then I’m setting off for a month.  This will be the longest that I’ve been home since July!  I’m already feeling restless…

I hope you’re keeping up on the blog because I will be posting much more often due to followers’ requests.  The blog has exceeded 5000 views!  I can’t tell you how happy it makes me to know that people are becoming more and more interested in something that is so important.  Please feel free to request posts about subjects relating to what you want to hear.  Keep checking back for a story on my new method of transportation for the next leg of my journey!